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Some not-so-great SharePoint features

Posted by Gia Lyons on April 4, 2008

I’ve seen or heard the following about using and managing SharePoint sites. Please let me know if anything should be corrected:

It takes nine clicks and one moment of typing to add someone to a SharePoint site.

  1. Click People and Groups
  2. Click New
  3. Click Add Users
  4. Click Address Book icon
  5. Type name in Find textbox
  6. Click Search icon
  7. Click name in resultset
  8. Click Add button
  9. Click OK button
  10. Click another OK button

I’m tired just reading that. To be fair, users experience something similar in some of the default templates in Lotus Quickr, but I know that we’re working on reducing the number of clicks.

In Lotus Connections Activities (which, of course, does not do everything a SharePoint teamsite does), it takes three clicks and some typing:

  1. Click Add Members
  2. Type a name (as you type, matches from the LDAP appear dynamically)
  3. Click name in resultset
  4. Click OK

Restoring a teamsite that has gone down requires the restoration of the entire SharePoint instance’s database first.

All the data and files are stored in the SQL Server database as a BLOB. Even a simple document. If a teamsite goes down for any reason, you must first restore the SQL Server database for the entire SharePoint instance, then extract the content for the teamsite you want to restore, then create a new teamsite, and then re-deploy that site with the extracted content.

I’ve only personally experienced adding a user, but not restoring a site, so corrections are welcome, if necessary.

2 Responses to “Some not-so-great SharePoint features”

  1. All the data and files are stored in the SQL Server database as a BLOB. Even a simple document. If a teamsite goes down for any reason, you must first restore the SQL Server database for the entire SharePoint instance, then extract the content for the teamsite you want to restore, then create a new teamsite, and then re-deploy that site with the extracted content.

    and you would expect any different from Microslop? This is exactly the routine for restoring lost messages in an Exchange database. Microserfs will say “But look at all the space it saves in the enterprise” to which my standard reply is “and that pays for your overtime reinstalling the entire mail database because some pinhead wants to get back one lost message?”

    Last I checked, terrabyte NAS devices costs less than 3 hours of my salary.

  2. Gia Lyons said

    Buddha, zackly. Ok, bad analogy time. The people who invented pantyhose actually have the technology to make them so well that they’d never run or tear. But then, we’d stop buying pantyhose so often, which would “hurt the economy.”

    Much software development seems to follow the same reasoning.

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